finite is the world.


a bunch of bullshit. irrelevant, and meaningless.
Quote
“I’m a very private person. You don’t ask, I don’t tell.”

— Unknown (via mrsfscottfitzgerald)

(Source: psych-facts)



Reblogged from Cold heart.

June 19, 2014, 6:13am

Photograph

fuckyouverymuch:

We make the best of it.

fuckyouverymuch:

We make the best of it.



Reblogged from fuck you very much.

June 13, 2014, 6:40am

Photograph

(Source: iamheretopleaseyou)



Reblogged from An Existential Life.

June 07, 2014, 10:23pm

Photograph

reddlr-earthporn:

Sunset at Cape Kidnapper, Napier, NZ [2560x1920] [OC]

reddlr-earthporn:

Sunset at Cape Kidnapper, Napier, NZ [2560x1920] [OC]



Reblogged from r/EarthPorn.

June 07, 2014, 10:22pm

Photograph

neuromaencer:

still from tron legacy by joseph kosinski

neuromaencer:

still from tron legacy by joseph kosinski

(Source: ephemeralol)



Reblogged from DETHJUNKIE*.

June 07, 2014, 10:20pm

Quote
“I didn’t fall in love with you. I walked into love with you, with my eyes wide open, choosing to take every step along the way. I do believe in fate and destiny, but I also believe we are only fated to do the things that we’d choose anyway. And I’d choose you; in a hundred lifetimes, in a hundred worlds, in any version of reality, I’d find you and I’d choose you.”

— Kiersten White, The Chaos of Stars (via mrsfscottfitzgerald)

(Source: aknai)



Reblogged from Cold heart.

June 06, 2014, 7:36pm

Video

fuzzbutt-the-serk:

MOTHER FUCKING COLOUR THEORY YO

(Source: the-more-u-know)



Reblogged from Cave Of Serk.

June 06, 2014, 2:57pm

Photograph

nprbooks:

Check out our interview with Reading the OED author Ammon Shea about his new book, Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation.
My personal favorite language-police fact: people used to get really mad about the WORD “television” (instead of the programming, how novel) because it combines the Greek “tele” and the Latin “vision” — Manchester Guardian editor C.P. Scott famously harrumphed, “Television? The word is half Latin and half Greek. No good can come of it.”
— Petra

nprbooks:

Check out our interview with Reading the OED author Ammon Shea about his new book, Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation.

My personal favorite language-police fact: people used to get really mad about the WORD “television” (instead of the programming, how novel) because it combines the Greek “tele” and the Latin “vision” — Manchester Guardian editor C.P. Scott famously harrumphed, “Television? The word is half Latin and half Greek. No good can come of it.”

— Petra



Reblogged from NPR.

June 04, 2014, 5:54pm

Photograph



Reblogged from Casa de Ricardo.

June 04, 2014, 10:46am

Video

nevver:

Never get out of the car, Vanscapes by Alison Turner

(Source: alisonturnerphoto.com)



Reblogged from NPR.

June 04, 2014, 10:46am

Out Loud Podcast: The Knausgaard Phenomenon

Text

newyorker:

In Karl Ove Knausgaard’s native Norway, around one in nine people have purchased copies of his six-volume autobiographical novel, and some employers have had to impose Knausgaard-free days in the workplace. What makes the books so mesmerizing? http://nyr.kr/1kFNqfY

Photograph by Gunter Gluecklich/laif/Redux.



Reblogged from The New Yorker.

June 04, 2014, 9:53am

Quote
“You can ask the universe for all the signs you want, but ultimately, we see what we want to see when we’re ready to see it.”

— Unknown  (via mrsfscottfitzgerald)

(Source: chim0)



Reblogged from Cold heart.

June 04, 2014, 9:51am

Photograph

kamasitra:

The unbroken seal on Tutankhamun’s tomb 1922. 3,245 years untouched.

kamasitra:

The unbroken seal on Tutankhamun’s tomb 1922. 3,245 years untouched.



Reblogged from Casa de Ricardo.

June 04, 2014, 7:24am

Quote
“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.”

— Bruce Lee (via mrsfscottfitzgerald)

(Source: thedailypozitive)



Reblogged from Cold heart.

June 03, 2014, 7:24pm

Video

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.



Reblogged from NPR.

June 03, 2014, 9:41am

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